Posts Tagged ‘David Horton’

Multi Day Update

July 30, 2009

“I DIDN’T FAIL” – David Horton on the Colorado Trail

David, the multi-day king, wanted to go out on a good note after a sour day on the CDT last year. He and Jonathan Basham came to Colorado to train and acclimate for three weeks; their preparation was good.

I was thus taken aback when David’s smiling face greeted me at the Grouse Gulch aid station during the HR100. He was in excellent spirits, looked good, and it was great to see him. He had called it quits after 6 days – oddly while still right on schedule for the record – but with mounting issues that clearly precluded continuation.

His blog has an excellent account, excerpted here:

DH“Going after the CT record might have been my most difficult multi-day attempt so far. The CT record is very TOUGH. The trail itself was tougher than I thought it would be. I averaged 40 miles per day on the PCT and AT and 45 miles per day running across America. Averaging over 54 miles per day on the CT was VERY tough. I started very day before daylight, usually around 4:00 AM and finished every day after dark. My average time on the trail was around 17 hours per day. This left very little time for anything. I was usually in bed 30 to 45 minutes after finishing each day. Each day, the last section ATE my lunch. It took everything that I had to finish each day. I never knew at night if I would be able to go again the next day.”

“Day 6 should have been an easy day but it was not. We got lost before daylight and ran 4 miles off course. Later in the day it was very hot and the dry heat started sucking the life out of me. In the middle of the days my hands started swelling, sausage fingers you say. I have had them before but NEVER as big as they got this time. In the last section of the day, I became very concerned about them and how big can they get before damage occurs. On the back of my hands, the skin stuck grossly very high. My forearms started swelling all the way up to my elbows. It was getting tighter and tighter. How big can they get?? What damage can occur?? I was also thinking about the next day as it was going to be the toughest day yet, over 60 miles with one road crossing. I knew the possibility that if I got in trouble in this section that I would put myself and my crew in a serious problem. I knew then that I must stop. Could I have run the next day? Yes. Could I have caused myself or others some serious problems? Yes.”

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Upcoming Multi-Day Trail Record Attempts

May 21, 2009

The season is gearing up! Here are just a few of the Big Trail record attempts developing.

COLORADO TRAIL – David Horton

The professor emeritus of multi-day trail records is back! David set the record on the Appalachian Trail in 1991, followed up with the record on the Long Trail in 1999, and after a John Muir Trail attempt  aborted on the first day, became the first person to do a supported run on the Pacific Crest Trail, establishing in 2005 what is still fastest time.  (An excellent video called “The Runner” was made of this project). Last year David tried the biggest big trail of them all, the Continental Divide Trail, but abandoned after the first day, June 7, which went very badly.

This year he hopes to start in Denver at 6 am on July 4 and break Paul Pomeroy’s 2008 record 8 1/2 days later in Durango.  This timing would enable him to be on the Hardrock 100 course, a race he has won, when the race itself is taking place – the HR100 and CT courses are briefly the same.  That would be remarkable.

ct-map

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Multi Multi Days

June 24, 2008

Here’s a summary of notable multi-day action:

RUNNING AMERICA

Well known ultra/adventure runners Charlie Engle and Marshall Ulrich announced plans last winter to set a new record running across the US.  They had major funding, publicity, and an extremely ambitious plan: 70 miles per day.

Their May 24 start date came and went and I didn’t hear anything.  A recent web search disclosed that they apparently have made the project even larger, by combining it with a National Geographic documentary, and the run appears to be still on for Aug 8.

Other than that website I know nothing; if anyone does, please post a Comment.

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL RECORD ATTEMPT

An even better known ultra runner (one of the best actually), David Horton, set out on June 7 to set a new record on the CDT.  This had obvious appeal, as David is the current supported record holder on the PCT as well as the previous speed record holder on the Appalachian Trail.  The CDT would complete his Triple Crown of long trails.  The plan was to cover the estimated 2,959 miles in 69 days (42.9 mpd).

However, the CDT was not to be.   The effort was abandoned at the end of the first day due to dehydration and exhaustion.  Yikes.

APPALACHIAN TRAIL RECORD ATTEMPT

Starting on August 5, Karl Meltzer will attempt to do the 2,175 mile Appalachian Trail in less than 47 days (46.25 mpd).  Like David before him, Karl is one of the best-known and accomplished ultrarunners in the country.  It’s gonna be good.

This blog will have more updates and a live “chat” with Karl in mid July.  In the meantime, there is excellent info here, including interviews with David, Flyin’ Brian, and Trail Dog:  http://www.mountainrunning.com/


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